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but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong.
states of america. and to the republican for which it stands, one nation under god, and with lib if i and justice for all. thank you. please be seated. before we get started ilgd like to recognize a few special guests we have with us. i would like to begin with a welcome to one of our members of board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california pete wilson. governor. [applause] [applause] our county supervisor peter floyd. peter, thank you for coming. [applause] now for those of who who were patient enough to go through the book signing line prior to the event this evening we yo know the wonderful woman is here with us tonight. she's "the new york times" best selling officer and president of gingrich productions. please join me in recognizing calista fig h -- gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a special guest. if i i know if i were simply to give the typical dinner circuit gingrich the one where you list every accomplishment of the speaker's bio. i promise you we would be here all night and newt would get bored. the list of achievements in politics, his in
me. announcer: play a role in ending hunger. visit feedingamerica.org/hunger and find your local food bank. $82 bi lou: foreign buyers are helping to boost our housing msarket. those buyers accounted for billn $82 billion in home sales over the past year. 9 billion of those dollarschines coming from th chinese. t second only to those canadians, as the largest one homebuyers in presidenntry. the io and president ofao citimortgage, he is joining us the ov let's start with the overaller robustness come to power of thit recovery. is it too strong of a language to join these concepts?18 out o >> the housing is recovering on a sustained basis. eighteen out of 20 top cities are now showing growth. [inaudible] lou: what do you think? lo >> the general view is if you look at long-term trends fromne, 1968 onward, you know that there was a bubble in the 2006 and wei 2007 time.the general vi the general view is that it will take a while to get their. lou: so someone is looking at am profit and they might eagerlyrah jumper t at that rather than wat for a full gross? >> that is the general deal. th
disgraceful. george will is one of the most recognizable people in america today. certainly, the most widely known intellectual. he is the author of the least a dozen books. since the early days of the show, he has been a regular on what is now "this week with george stephanopoulos." he is an astute philosopher. he is a native of illinois, a student of baseball, a lifelong cubs fan, and as such, he is a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief. [laughter] [applause] despite their rudeness of the invitation, he is my friend. george well. -- will. [applause] >> jack's invitation is perfectly acceptable. my dear friend william f. buckley once called up his friend charleton heston, the actor, and said chuck, do you believe in free speech? he said, of course. he said good, you are about to give one. it is a delight to be back here. it is a delight to be back on campus. long ago and far away, i was a college professor. in 1976, two of my friends ran for the senate against each other in new york state. the night they were both nominated, jim buckley got up and said, i look forward to running agains
produced disaster, heartbreak, crime, death. it has been a disaster for america. most of all for black people, and to the point of it is to say don't fall for white guilt again, america. the last time you fell for it was in 2008, and look what that produced. so don't fall for it again but don't make the same mistake again. and also i think it's a fun book to read. most of it will be stored you have never read before. thank you and i will sign your books now. [applause] >> is this yours? >> know, that's a mine. >> thanks. thank you. are you leaving? >> i have to. spent it's your fault we didn't get to mingle. >> i know. i'm sorry. >> i got to come back to d.c. that's all i'm getting from you? >> you already got enough from me. spent i was just telling my friend how i tell all the whippersnappers, you hang on islands everywhere. you was the one and you just don't even care about that. you don't even care. and also, we always agree. like when we ran off -- i know. my whole support for christie was like running off with a biker. i'm back to romney. you write about that. >> [inaudible] >> i
the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the kind of people that can get all of them. it has gone back and forth. while the fire he said raged, the gunman killed himself. he had already spent 17 years in prison for killing his grandmother. as a convicted criminal, he was not allowed to possess firearms. a cold christmas awaits the families of two firefighters. bbc news, washington. >> in afghanistan, at least seven security officials including an american adviser have been killed by local police officers. in the first shooting, a policewoman opened fire inside the police headquarters, killing the americans. it is the first time a female member of the afghan services has turned on a member of the nato force. a report. >> the 33-year-old was a sergeant with the afghan national police, and earlier this morning, the woman shot and killed a civilian adviser. according to officials, she had planned to kill senior afghan officials but could not find any so shot the advisor instead. at the police headquarters, it is one of the m
spent $16 billion in three weeks. but america was not going to disappear. it was -- there was panic, no question about it. and we were -- the dominos were toppling and everything, but america wasn't going to go away. >> you had confidence in america. >> sure. >> i remember mika and i went over, i forget where it was, but we went over to host an event, a roundtable, simpson/bowles, and as we were walking in, one person after another, they were all talking about you, and not about how you were brilliant or how you were rich. they all talked about the confidence you had in america, while everybody else is talking about a rise in china, everybody else was talking about how we were collapsing, they said, you should have heard what warren buffett said. the guy is more bullish on america than ever before. why is that? >> how could you be otherwise? we've come through a civil war, two world wars, the great depression, you name it. and this country works. just look where we were in 1776 and where we are now. >> i here the president talking about moving the top tax rate up to 39.6%. and i'm j
in the world. we need good news. >> america's pastor rick warren joins me. >> people say i fell out of love. that's your choice. >> he talks religion, reason, and what america needs now. >> the good life isn't good enough. what you need is the better life. >> the election, the economy, same-sex marriage and more, to the issues that really matter. >> you know why we have to change the constitution? it was a flawed document. it was made by men. >> what does god mean to you? this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening, and happy holidays and welcome to a special "piers morgan tonight." joining me, one of the most influential spiritual leaders in the world, rick warren. we're going to talk about politics, sins, and much, much more. he's the author of "a purpose driven life." >> it's good to be here with you. >> what is the purpose of christmas? >> you know, the angels in the story the first christmas said three things. those three statements say the three purposes of christmas. they are celebration, salvation, and reconciliation. first thing the angels said was, i bring you good news of gre
in america we will outperform the other schools in five years. how good our charter schools? >> unions say they are four problem kids. >> up until now the adults have run the show and make us stupid in america. school spending has tripled over the past 40 years. three sped much more than other countries but what do we get? student learning? no improvement. look at it. there is the line. 40 years the scores have been flat much more money no improvement that there is good news and around america very cool things are starting to happen. >> school is boring. >> knollwood is not. >> as it is. i went to school. grade school was boring so was high school and so was princeton except for the party part of fourth grade? we have to learn reading and writing and that is work. >> reading is work but it is rocking also. >> they say school is fun? how is it fun to learn? >> they teach us enough on ways to make you look forward to going to school in the morning? >> yes. >> the attend a new charter schools the charter lets them escape the bureaucracy of regular school including the teachers union. this in
in america. why do people freeload? what you think you know, often is not so. myth and truth. that is our show. tonight. john: what you think you know, may not be so? we know what. we watch tv while good what we know not be so? our instincts are often wrong. when i was a consumer reporter i thought consumer regulation was the answer. rahm. it hurts america of more. i thought america was running out of fuel, overpopulation, made in america. wrong. >> majority leader harry reid is upset the usoc bought uniforms from china. >> they should be burned and start over again. john: people are desperate for jobs. isn't it outrageous we buy uniforms made overseas? no. in this stupid. let me bring in professional help. why not to worry about sending work to other countries? >> a fundamental trade makes everybody off. it benefits both parties. john: they could have been made by american workers. >> but we are so much better at other things that making garments is not the comparative advantage. john: that is not a problem. those are factory jobs they're not so pleasant they're designed and marketed an
are from rural america and many of them are overseas today away from their homes and families so we can be safe and free. we thank them for their service. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you so much. this tree has been on a tremendous journey. in fact, it traveled 5,500 across the country from colorado. and just nine days ago, the tree arrived here on the west front of the capitol and our dedicated capitol grounds crew went to work to decorate it. didn't they do a fantastic job? [applause] >> let me also thank our capitol grounds superintendent who had the tough task of selecting just one tree from the many beautiful trees found in the white river national forest. next, ladies and gentlemen, it's my honor and pleasure to introduce congressman scott tipton. he has been serving the people of the 3rd district of colorado in the u.s. house of representatives since 2010. congressman tipton. [applause] >> thank you, steve. i would like to thank the secretary for his kind comments and i think it's important to note in addition to our united states senators, we are joined by the entire
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
who serve with them. tragic for america. lou: and the part that you said where it is tragic foru: us us. in our various institutions, since there are no consequences. sitting in an aircraft, we have a pretty strong light, and this actually the architect and the guy who presided over the largest conflict in american history, a conflict we have not won. >> to his credit, we have to give general petraeus credit. he is paid a price, nobody comes a general without slipping up to the top. i have extraordinary respect for these folks. lou: you say these folks. no one respects for supports more or military than i do. if you will, i will not indulge the plural. i'm talking about a man who sent the cia down the gutter. >> i will not defend what he did, you can't. lou: why don't we try to get to what is going on. why are we putting up with this kind of nonsense and recognizing there is a culture the military and in washington that we have to get a hold of. >> i think it is a culture all over our society. look at the sports world. virtually no part of our culture in which people don't feel they
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
disappears and nobody knows where he is. he hops up in a mall in america and gives himself up and when he's brought in he says that he's converted to become a muslim and has put these bombs around the place. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far everybody concerned is prepared to go to get the information out of him. it was an incredibly difficult film to make for me. i remember one of the first days of the torture thing which is is something where i was chained to the ceiling and hosed down with water with fans blowing on me. and i said how are we going to do this and they said we're going to do it but not for very long. that set up a precedent for the hole film. that was a very frightening thing to go through. a point you brought up which is the idea that people's desire to be involved in helping the imaging of this completely depends on what they believe is how they are being portrayed in it. and that gets very complicated. >> it's a public they report they are trying to not to
. [applauding] john: what does your brain tl you that america should do about our problem? we have plenty. a lot of people are poor. we should spread the wealth around. i hear busesses raise prices and gouge people. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ought to be a law, government ought to do something. that's just the way pple think, it's instinct. i have to admit how i used to think, took me decades to realize i was wrong, passing a law often does more harm than good. and progress comes from millions of individuals acting to make themselves better off guided by an invisible hand that inadvertently helps others. not to viewers of the "stossel" show, but to normal people. when there is a problem, government should address it. my next guest says they know what our brain is wired that way. an evolutionary psychiatrist at the university of california santa barbara and the author of the mind of the market. so, there is your book, let me start with you since you talk about the mind. you say the faith in government comes from evolution and? >> the natural propensity we have is
're following tonight. a series of storms set to barrel across america, possibly producing christmas day tornadoes in the south and then a huge mess in the northeast. just as people are trying to get home after the holiday. in parts of the country, the action has already begun, and here's abc's alex perez. >> reporter: it's the nightmare before christmas travelers were hoping to avoid. blankets of snow from central new york to northern california creating christmas chaos for some parts of the country. >> we're hoping we don't sit on the runway. we did that last time and it's not fun. >> reporter: in chicago, paula gagerman and her three daughters arrived early for their christmas eve flight. they are among the millions taking to the crowded skies today. what's that stress like when you got to get somewhere and you're traveling with family and it's not -- mother nature is not cooperating? >> extremely stressful. >> we're like, come on, come on, come on. we just want to get there. come on, we're going to be late, we're going to be late, come on. it's really annoying. >> reporter: in northe
, a neighborhood with one the densest concentrations of drug addicts in north america. the portland hosts the only legal injection site in north america, a center that's come under fire from canada's conservative government. i asked dr. matÉ to talk about his patients. >> the hardcore drug addicts that i treat, but according to all studies in the states, as well, are, without exception, people who have had extraordinarily difficult lives. and the commonality is childhood abuse. in other words, these people all enter life under extremely adverse circumstances. not only did they not get what they need for healthy development, they actually got negative circumstances of neglect. i don't have a single female patient in the downtown eastside who wasn't sexually abused, for example, as were many of the men, or abused, neglected and abandoned serially, over and over again. and that's what sets up the brain biology of addiction. in other words, the addiction is related both psychologically, in terms of emotional pain relief, and neurobiological development to early adversity. >> what does the title of yo
that there were special events that san francisco will often do. whether it be the america's cup, sunday games, giants streets they will wake up for the car that is typically legally parked on this their street and find out they can't get it back but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide thi
? >> it leaves cut taxes. >> i'd like to see taxes go down and someone say america is great. let's do everything we can to eliminate obstacles to success vmax my next guest says that regulations are really killing business. we have congressman eric cantor, the house majority leader is pushing to cut the red tape. and since he does have out there, he actually has a shot at doing it. it's just too hard right ow for businesses to continue to operate, given all the onerous and burdensome regulations coming out of washington. and we want to make that stop so we can turn the country around and began to be a starter country again. know th the obama administration over the course of the term has imposed 400 regulations that impose more than $0 million of costs annually on small businesses. the small business administration has said that there are so many regulary burdens on small business that it cost them $10,000 per employee. those are the kinds of things that we want to stop right now so we can see more startup and jobs created. >> is one thing to hope for freezing regulations. but i guess we had hop
the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states this year, more than any other country in the world. we know that libya is still recovering from an intense period of conflict. there are many courageous libyans who bear the scars of that battle. we are happy we have b
confederate states of america. which covered a state larger than the entire european territory, conquered by napoleon. linke's closest advisor was secretary of state william henry seward. seward says that even smart people fail to see the difficulty of the union's task. they didn't apprehend the vast extent of the rebellion as he put it. military operations to be successful must be on a scale practically unknown in the art of four. yet the war department was an corrupt shambles, its chief on the verge of being fired. the confederacy also fielded a powerful economic weapon, near total control of the global continents apply. this was a time when textiles were driving the industrial revolution and cotton was perhaps the world's most important single commodity. the south refuse to sell cotton unless the british and french government recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will no
. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america,digning group, individual, and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. the bells rang for the lost. charlotte bacon, olivia engle, anna marquez green, catherine hubbard, emilie parker, jack pinto, noah posner, jssica ricos, benjamin wheeler, and allison wyatt. all were 6 years old. daniel barden and grace mcdonald were 7. six adults died with them. mary sherlock, dawn hochsprung, victoria soto. it helps to say their names to rescue them from the stistal anonymity that always settles over these awful events. it helps those of us distanced from the loss to imagine to even grieve the emptiness of the homes and hearts of those who loved them. we will never forget. we mourn, move on, and too soon forget. then it will happen again some day. we'll scratch our heads and ask ourselves, was the last time newtown or columbine? was it aurora or that college in virginia? once again, we will mourn, move on, and too soon forget. there is an old saying that in remembrance is the secret of redemption. but a
, too. after a last-minute frenzy in malls across america -- >> i am not going over my limit. >> american settled down for christmas. some will come to the holiday inn church, giving prayer's and thanks with their family. for americans in afghanistan, at a christmas feast with a reminder of life back in the states and the loved ones they left behind. >> i do feel homesick. >> i miss the opportunity to be with my family. many of these soldiers realize that price. >> with america winding down its wars, there is a lot to look forward to. >> welcome home! >> these warriors are back on the home front. what better gift for christmas than a family reunion? lawmakers are not getting much of a break. they are coming back to the capitol to finish their fight over the fiscal cliff. >> anyone who has not taken advantage of the tax credit, act fast. you have a few days to save hundreds of dollars. officials are reminding all consumers to postmarked applications by december 31 or you'll have to wait another year. the legislation in 2007 by the state general assembly. homeowners must submit
states of america or everyone in it or do you have to negotiate with this man's human rights? so the film was a dramatization of that. and again very difficult to read what the politics of it were. you can watch the entire film and again everyone has their own view of it and being the man who -- actually the film is about a c.i.a. agent who is working in iraq disappears and nobody knows where he is. he hops up in a mall in america and gives himself up and when he's brought in he says that he's converted to become a muslim and has put these bombs around the place. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far everybody concerned is prepared to go to get the information out of him. it was an incredibly difficult film to make for me. i remember one of the first days of the torture thing which is is something where i was chained to the ceiling and hosed down with water with fans blowing on me. and i said how are we going to do this and they said we're going to do it but not for very long. tha
of political power that america produced in the second half of the 20th century and endless fascinating to watch him use it over and over again in this book, the passage of power, to see him step into the presidency where president kennedy is assassinated with no preparation at all, think of no preparation at all after political scientists say the time between election day nov. inauguration day is 11 weeks, that is too short a time for a president to get ready to assume office. lyndon johnson had two hours and six minutes in which he was sworn in on the plane, air force one, let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off of the plane, ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks af
. >> it's the holiday season. >> reporter: for "good morning america," rob nelson, new york. >>> pope benedict is using christmas to call for peace in the middle east. at last night's mast, he called on us to find time in our hectic lives for children, the poor and god. the pontiff noted with the time-saving technology, that people have less time for what matters in life. >>> in west new york, a community is mourning two firefighters that were shot to death as they responded to a call. the shooter, 62-year-old ex-con, killed himself. several homes burned down. and the gunman's sister who lived with him, is among those still unaccounted for. >>> the entertainment world is mourning actor jack klugman. best moknown for playing oscar madison in "the odd couple." klugman had dozens of other credits in films and television. including an emmy for a dramatic role. jack klugman was 90 years old. >>> and a denver man is hoping for more than most this christmas. he's hoping for a new life, courtesy of the white house. eight years ago, a brutal beating left benjamin kyle with no memory of who he
that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother as a child and she looked birds and animals and was fascinated from a very early age. she was a gifted student and a talented
a bygone america, who doesn't have anything to say to the voters who are going to make up our winning margin. but to wrap that thing back around, the 47%, romney did more -- all of that damage had been done by how the obama team painted him. and then romney came out with his own words, revealed in september, seemingly and vividly confirm welcome in his own words, through his own mouth, caught on videotape, all of the worst stereotypes and caricatures that the obama campaign -- >> jonathan capehart, though, the 47%, we focus on that, we forget, this is a guy that gets -- i'm sorry, greatest hits for democratic admakers. "i like firing people," remember that one? there were like ten other ones just like that. >> that's a good one. >> he would win a big victory in florida and the next morning and going on cable news show and say something equally shocking. >> "i'm not concerned about the very poor". >> yeah. >> yeah, for me, the 47% video was so -- i mean, it was shocking in its sort of brutal honesty, but also, how he was able to just deride half the country, literally half the country,
. she has been able to focus on the problems here in america while she is done a tremendous job overseas. host: what would you like to see out of there? caller: become the next president of united states. i think it is a strong possibility. you mentioned travel and keeping people safe. any specific accomplishment that sticks out in your mind? caller: meeting with the pakistanis leaders and going to different countries and dealing with the world issues and being a good negotiator, peacemaker and her demeanor. unbelievable and outstanding. host: ruth from texas, you are on. caller: my hero is mitt romney. if he had been elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i look forward to him doing better. host: one thing that stands out as far as his accomplishments. caller:
spokesperson told the wall street journal that the outage stressed across the americas. >>> saying farewell to the beloved american actor. how hollywood is remembering the queer of this man. >> and we are being shot at, both firefighters are down. >> a community dealing with the deadly ambush attack on volunteer firefighters. what we're learning about that gunman. >>> and the queen of england, she puts a high-tech twist on a holiday message. ,,,,,,,,,, actor jack k >>> some of us knew him as a half of the odd couple. now, the actor, he died today in los angeles. he won two emmys for his role as the messy sports writer, oscar madison, who drove felix crazy for five seasons, in the early 70s tv show, the odd couple. but his stage film and the television career, it spanned more than five decades. he passed away in his home with his wife at his side as he was 90 years old. >>> they were only doing their jobs, answering a call for help when a team of firefighters, they suddenly needed help of their own. cbs reporter tatiana anderson and the hail of gunfire that greeted them withdeadly results. >
number of other abolitionists over there when he got back to america he was going to train slaves, who's going to sell them on land as sharecroppers, and the certainty they would become good citizens and free people in the united states. but when he got back to the united states, things changed. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. >> next, edwidge danticat, a contributor to the anthology, so spoke the earth, talk to booktv about the anthology and aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. >> well now, joining us here on our booktv set is edwidge ys is danticat, who is an author, and t most recent book is "so spokes the earth: the haiti i know, the haiti i wantto know." edwidge danticat come in thhaiti january 2010, where were you? >> on january 2010 i was here in miami. i was in a supermarket with myus daughter when someone called me and said that there had been and earthquake in haiti. rthquake in. of course, so many lives were changed on. i lost so many family and friends in and the country lost something like 200,000 people. >> host: when was your first
, across the americas. >>> saying farewell to a beloved american actor. how holiday is remembering the career of jack klugman. >>> a terrible christmas for another community dealing with a deadly shooting. the ambush attack on volunteer firefighters and what we're learning about the gunman. >>> and the clean of england with a high-tech twist on her holiday message. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, w him as a >>> some of us knew him as oscar madison, one half of the odd couple. others knew him as quincy. today we learned jack klugman died in los angeles. he won who emmies as the messy sports writer who drove felix crazy. but his stage film and television career spanned more than five decades. he passed away at his home with his wife at his side. jack klugman was 90 years old. >>> they were only doing their jobs. answering the call for help, when a team of firefighters suddenly needed help themselves. cbs reporter on the hail of gunfire that greeted them. >> reporter: firefighters rushed to this early morning fire near rochester, new york, and were met by bullets. police say william spengler star
-- americans love football. do you think it can expand beyond america? >> well, we had great success over in the u.k. next year we'll expand it to two games and we're playing in toronto. we have had great success in other markets like mexico and the far east. i believe our future is very bright overseas. the game is very popular. our fans on a global basis want more and more football. that's what we're doing. we're responding to that interest. >> you talked about the culture. football players in the nfl are role models and in the nba as well and in other professional sports. how do you make sure that the players appreciate that by their personal conduct? >> well, we have a personal conduct policy which was put together with the players. and it's very important because they are role models and they're held to a higher standard. i think all of us in the nfl are held to a higher standard. when we don't reflect well on what i call the nfl or ourselves, then we're going to be held accountable. we have a program that's focused on education. it's on discipline. and when people do
of those here, so with the america cup's races which we had been planning for starting at the beginning of the year. three successful exercises in preparation for the first week of racing that took place in august and continued in october and as the mayor mentioned october was incredibly busy for us with america's cup and the fleet week activities we had going on, to additional exercises. we had a senior leader seminar and a disaster aid presentation on marina green. other things that took place that the mayor mentioned the bluegrass and castro street parade and a finer and giants game and lead to the playoffs and all happened on the same day so when we go we definitely go big. after those activities we had the annual shake out drill, one of the largest demonstrations of the public what their responsibilities are to be ready and we rolled into the playoffs and the world series and admiral you will be happy to know this facility is used on a regular basis and get the departments together and communicate and collaborate and make sure we're prepared of the future. >> you're kind and yo
[spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take a moment to colleagues remind you that you started the conversation around reforms year ago and conducted many meetings and trying to reform the jeopardia and the biz tax that we reformed just this last november and i remember having conversation with you about that before i joined this board in the small business commission and thank you for putting that idea in my head. i know that you have had tremendous service in sacrament toe and i hope and believe that you will continue to public service in years to come and hope to work pa with you in that capacity and i want to thank you on my behalf. >> thank you very much we are so happen to be here to acknowledge all of the work that you have done and i have to say in our own distribution, fee i don't evenna served [spelling?] served distribution four and you set the bar so high and i can remember now people
, of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >>> colleagues we have board meeting minutes from october 23, november twired and could i a motion to approve those minutes. motion by campus and seconded by advocate lows and those minutes are approved. and if you could read our two parliament special order. >> the first item of business between the board of supervisors this week representing district will he and 11 the mayor may address the board initially for five minutes and the board will recognize the supervisor with their questions and the entire discussion may be exceed five minutes per supervisor, mr. mayor welcome back to the champ for your final questions see if you have any opening comments. >> thank you president chew supervisors we made it to the end of the year and this is the last question time for 2012 and it's been a great year, a lot of accomplishments and i want to thank each and every one of you for each of the valuable leadership that you have provided along the way. we
and building consensus in america and by doing so and by listening and leadership from the white house we are able to be a model to the nation with projects of national significance so that other communities can follow our lead, and i join the mayor in seluting the leadership of president barack obama. without his leadership, his priorities, without the work that was done in appropriations committee and diane is a senior -- when i say senior i mean high ranking. i was a senior too so i take it as a complement but that's where a lot of this work is done so without president barack obama and his commitment to build america we wouldn't have this success today and it's a global vision but it has an impact on everyone that comes to san francisco and especially those that live in san francisco and makes a great difference in the lives of our friends in chinatown and we celebrate their work too and thank you very much for this very important day. [applause] >> so please check that score for me again nancy. our next speaker was once our mayor -- will always be our mayor, one that has served
and virgin america was designed by a world- renowned architecture's firm. originally built in 1954, the building underwent massive renovation to become the first registered terminal and one of the must modern and sustainable terminals and the united states. the public art program continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and t
about high school kids and free enterprise and what it i can takes to being successful in america and as business leaders we have to do that. i know the fear of speaking out. pre-election ways given opportunity to be on a specific show on a specific topic and i was afraid my stand and how passionate i was about it and how that might play out and affect my franchisees. melissa: really? >> we know what happened with chick-fil-a earlier in the year. melissa: right. >> that wasn't a political stance. it was, belief of the ceo of chick-fil-a. unfortunately reality in today's polarized world with social media, those of us who are willing to speak out have to understand that there is the possibility that those who disagree with us are going to use that against us in this crazy world of social media. and they can do that fairly effectively. melissa: catherine, i want to ask you more about that on the other side of this break and i also want to ask you guys, ceo of fedex, fred smith of fedex had a different approach to this. i want to get your reaction to the other side of the break. so do
breed in corporate america. we look at why so few c.e.o.'s are women. that and more, tonight on nbr. >> susie: not a very merry day of trading on wall street today. it was a holiday shortened session, and the investors and traders working on this half- day were playing it safe, especially with the fiscal cliff talks on holiday break as well. when the closing bell rang at 1:00 eastern time, the dow was down 51 points, the nasdaq lost eight, and the s&p was off 3 points. so while wall street worked half a day, washington was on vacation. lawmakers are increasingly pessimistic about a big agreement-- or any agreement-- being reached before the year ends. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: 'twas the night before christmas, and all through the house, nothing much was going on. it was the same story in the senate. washington's cliff talks still remain deadlocked. congress will return on thursday, and it's still possible a few days of holiday cheer and constituent outrage may push republicans and democrats to craft a last-minute agreement to avoid the worst of the fiscal cliff. if w
across america and around the world this christmas night. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. i'm carl quintanilla in tonight for brian. a large part of the country doesn't have to dream of a white christmas tonight. we are getting it. a major winter storm is bringing snow and thunderstorms to texas, oklahoma, alabama and arkansas. but that's not the only threat. tornadoes are a big concern along the gulf coast as the storm now moves to the north and east, threatening holiday travel. we have two reports tonight from those who cover it best, our friends at the weather channel. we begin with meteorologist jim cantore in hattiesburg, mississippi. >> reporter: this tornado outbreak is far from over. we've already had damage with injuries off to my south. and we are just under way with this multifaceted storm. there's no reason why birmingham and atlanta will not deal with severe thunderstorms. travel not recommended, arkansas all the way up into kentucky, southern illinois, missouri. that's where the blizzard conditions, nine states right now under blizzard conditions. on wednesday,
. it was morning in america. peter wallace and was a young whippersnapper in the treasury. surely president reagan would finish the job getting the government completely out of the mortgage business. there was even a perfect pretext. fannie mae was losing money at that time, $1 million a day because of the double-digit interest rates imposed by the fed to fight inflation so the white house might have used that crisis as a pretext to put fannie mae to sleep but it wasn't seen as the right time. the economy was wobbly, nobody wanted to upset the housing market. instead of putting any to sleep the reagan administration and congress gave it a tax break and helped it survive. by the 1980s fannie mae was making boat loads of money again and it was so profitable was almost embarrassing. now lessee of was a savvy fellow named david maxwell from philadelphia. maxwell knew that there was a fundamental choice to be made. a right wing would always push to abolish fannie mae because it was a form of socialism. the left wing would always be pressuring any and freddie to earn their keep by doing more for the 4.
in america that was in the forefront of everything. from holding president nixon accountable and watergate, every a congressman of the senate. in the middle of that senate was robert c. byrd. by the way, for those of you who want to write a book, having a publisher is a good thing. writing a book looking for a publisher later is not a good thing. i was very fortunate. i publisher said to me, all right, we will let you write the book. it cannot be a memoir. all right. can i pop up in the book occasionally? yeah, twice. the publisher said, it is narrated history. you need to tell a story. ok. i can tell stories. you cannot walk through this whole 18 year period. find a way to tell it. i said, all right. i decided to tell a story from the late 1970s leading up to that 1980s. america is beginning its third century. we have a new president, jimmy carter. we also have two new senate leaders, robert byrd and -- howard baker. by the way, i'm an honorary member of the west virginia state society. i have worked for robert byrd and rockefeller. i came face to face with byrd in writing this book. as m
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